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Mosquitoes Warn NSW Health About Murray Valley Encephalitis

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Mosquitoes Warn NSW Health About Murray Valley Encephalitis

(CTN News) – In the far west town of Menindee, a Mosquitoes has been found carrying a rare but potentially fatal virus called Murray Valley encephalitis.

Mosquitoes transmit Murray Valley encephalitis to humans.

Rarely, it can cause a serious brain infection, which can be fatal.

Infected people may experience fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches, and loss of appetite.

NSW Health said the new detection was likely related to Menindee flooding, which has been inundated by the Darling River since late December.

In Menindee, flood levels could reach record-breaking levels of 10.5 meters this week, according to the weather bureau.

According to Health Protection NSW’s Richard Broome, most people who were infected with MVE didn’t show any symptoms.

It’s only possible to avoid the virus by avoiding mosquito bites.

MVE doesn’t have a vaccine or specific treatment. Therefore, the most effective way to avoid infection is to not get bitten by mosquitoes, which are most active at dusk and dawn.

You’ll also be protected from other mosquito-borne infections, like Japanese encephalitis, Ross River fever, and Barmah Forest virus, if you avoid mosquito bites.”

It’s been a while since NSW had locally acquired MVE cases.

MVE was detected among mosquitoes in the north of the state today, according to the Victorian Department of Health.

The last human case was reported in 1974, so this is Victoria’s first detection in over 10 years.

A spike in mosquito populations is also increasing the risk of MVE in South Australia.

There have been 38 mosquito-borne diseases reported in South Australians this season, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV).

People can’t get MVE from touching an infected animal or eating animal products.

NSW Health recommends these things to help prevent the Mosquitoes virus:

  • Make sure there are no gaps in insect screens on windows and doors

  • Empty pots and old tyres outside your house may collect water that mosquitoes may breed in

  • Drain your property so water doesn’t stagnate

  • Wear light, loose-fitting long sleeve shirts, long pants, and covered footwear and socks at dusk and dawn.

  • Diethyltoluamide (DEET), picaridin, or lemon eucalyptus oil repellents should be applied to all exposed areas

  • Reapply repellent regularly, especially after swimming, and apply sunscreen before repellent

  • Repellent mosquitoes with insecticide sprays, vapour dispensers, and mosquito coils

A resident of Lake Cargelligo in the Lachlan Shire was the first to contract Japanese encephalitis (JE) this season.

An JE vaccine clinic will soon be opened in Lake Cargelligo, NSW Health says.

Menindee and Wilcannia pharmacist Mohammad Yousef has been vaccinating locals.

People here are suggesting electric zappers to control mosquitoes, he told the ABC.

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