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48 dead in US Deadliest Winter Storm, As Freezing Conditions Continue

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48 dead in US Deadliest Winter Storm, As Freezing Conditions Continue

(CTN News) – The United States is still experiencing freezing from a deadly winter storm as western New York deals with enormous snowdrifts that have backed up emergency vehicles, and travelers across the nation experience canceled flights and hazardous roads.

After locking some individuals inside their homes and cutting electricity to tens of thousands of residences and businesses, the winter storm has already claimed the lives of at least 48 people and is anticipated to take more.

Deadliest winter storms of recent decades in the US

The area closest to Buffalo in western New York state saw the brunt of the winter storm, with 43 inches of snow over 48 hours of zero visibility and hurricane-force gusts. Numerous residences were in the dark, and enormous snowdrifts almost buried automobiles.

Between the ages of 26 and 93, at least 27 persons had passed away in western New York, including a man, 27, who died from carbon monoxide poisoning when snow clogged his furnace. Many of the fatalities resulted from locals driving despite a driving prohibition.

People discovered outdoors and in automobiles were found dead, Buffalo police said in a statement. Two “isolated” incidents of looting during the winter storm, according to the police.

Because all of Buffalo’s firetrucks were once trapped, rescue squads eventually needed rescue. Eleven ambulances had to be pulled out.

The rescue crew was saving other rescuers. Mark Poloncarz, the executive of Erie County, stated on Sunday, “It was awful. I’m not sure what more we could have done when the rescuers had to be saved.

In the Buffalo suburb of Cheektowaga, two more persons passed away in their houses after emergency personnel could not reach them in time to address their medical issues.

Others were stranded in their vehicles for more than two days as heavy precipitation was brought on by frigid Arctic air flowing east across the Great Lakes.

During a press conference, Kathy Hochul, the governor of New York, said, “this is a fight with Mother Nature.” In Buffalo’s lengthy history of facing several conflicts and significant storms, this winter storm will be remembered as the most damaging one.

After visiting Buffalo on Monday, Hochul and the mayor of the city, Byron Brown, stressed during a news conference how crucial it is for people to stay at home and off the highways.

Hochul said, “Anyone who claims victory and thinks that it is done, it is simply too early to say,” and “The winter storm is coming back; we’re anticipating another six to 12 inches.”

Jeremy Manahan, a resident of Buffalo, reported going almost 29 hours without power. There is just one warming shelter, but I couldn’t reach it because of the distance.

I clearly can’t drive since I’m trapped,” he remarked. Additionally, you can’t spend longer than five minutes outdoors without getting frostbite.

According to Zila Santiago, he spent 11 hours stuck in a snowbank in his automobile with his four small children.

He stated he phoned the national guard, emergency agencies, and friends for assistance, but none showed up. He said he diverted his kids’ attention by watching Disney’s Frozen.

A single father named Santiago said he had turned to the highways since he could not afford to leave his children with a nanny. The man told the outlet, “I was essentially just hopeless.” I have never gone through or encountered anything like this in my life.

The severe weather affected the Great Lakes on Canada’s border and the Rio Grande on Mexico’s.

Temperatures fell well below average from east of the Rocky Mountains to the Appalachians, and around 60% of the US population was subject to some winter weather alert or warning.

The National Weather Service in the US said that while the big lake effect snow event downwind of the Great Lakes “will gradually come to an end by Tuesday,” the arctic air “enveloping most of the eastern part of the US will be sluggish to lessen.”

On Friday, Ditjak Ilunga of Gaithersburg, Maryland, and his children were en route to see family in Ontario for Christmas when their SUV became stuck in Buffalo.

They endured wind gusts and almost got buried in snow while spending hours with the engine running.

By 4am on Saturday, with almost no petrol left, Ilunga decided to go through the violent storm to a neighboring refuge. While 16-year-old Cindy held their pomeranian dog, he carried six-year-old Destiny on his back as they drove through drifts behind him.

Ilunga recalls thinking, “If I remain in this vehicle, I will die here with my kids.” When the family entered the refuge via the doors, he sobbed. It is something I will always remember.

Power was lost due to the winter storm in towns from Maine to Seattle. But across the US, heat and light were gradually being restored.

Following the statement by power provider PJM Interconnection that its utilities could meet the day’s peak electrical demand, concerns about rolling blackouts across eastern states decreased on Sunday.

The 65 million customers of the mid-Atlantic grid operator were urged to use less electricity on Saturday due to the cold.

Across the nation, winter storm-related fatalities were reported: six drivers were killed in crashes in Missouri, Kansas, and Kentucky; a falling branch struck a Vermont woman; a man who appeared to be homeless was discovered amid Colorado’s subzero temperatures, and a woman fell through Wisconsin river ice.

On Christmas Day, in Jackson, Mississippi, municipal authorities advised that people must boil their drinking water because water pipes had frozen and ruptured.

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