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Thailand to Reduce Road Accidents Over New Year and Songkran

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Road Accidents in Thailand Kill 2 People Every Hour

To reduce road accidents during Thailand’s New Year and Songkran holidays, the Traffic Accident Prevention Policy Committee will implement a new integration plan.

According to Traisuree Taisaranakul, deputy government spokeswoman, the plan, written by the Road Safety Operation Center, aims to reduce the number of road deaths and injuries from traffic accidents by at least 5% below the average number calculated from records of road accidents dating back three years.

The plan is made up of five major components that can help reduce the risk factors that lead to accidents.

“They include traffic risk factor control measures such as roadworks and public transportation,” she explained.

“They also focus on individual factors such as drunk driving and riding motorcycles without a helmet,” she added.

“They also cover victim assistance measures such as medical support and an emergency medical services configuration.”

The plan includes suggestions for local governments such as checkpoints and infomercial activities via public address systems and local radio.

Each year, the plan will be divided into two phases: pre-holiday and holiday.

She stated that the first phase of this year’s New Year festival will take place from December 1 to December 21.

Road users will be prepared for the new safety measures thanks to the government’s “Safe Driving in the New Normal” campaign, which teaches behaviour modification techniques.

The control measures will be implemented in the following phase, which will last from December 22 to January 11, 2023. The plan will be applied again during the Songkran holidays, with the first phase on March 1 to April 3, 2023, and the second phase April 4 to April 24, 2023.

Road Accidents Kill 278 People in Just 7 Days in Thailand

Over 32,000 Road Accidents in Thailand Over 2 Years

According to the Transport Ministry, Thailand, dubbed one of the most dangerous countries for driving, had 32,190 road accidents in 2020 and 2021, the majority of which involved pickup trucks.

Thailand was ranked as the second most dangerous country to drive in by a website, with 21,052 accidents reported in 2020 and 11,138 accidents reported in 2021.

The Zutobi website, a driver’s education portal that publishes a new score annually, reported in May that Thailand scored poorly on five different factors, placing it second on the list of the most dangerous countries to drive in.

Estimated road death rates, maximum motorway speed limits, seat belt use rates, alcohol-related deaths, and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limits are among the factors considered.

In its May report, Zutobi ranked Thailand second with 4.35 points, trailing only South Africa (3.41 points). The United States came in third place with 5.03 points.

According to the Ministry of Transport’s Data Catalogue, motorcycles did not cause the most accidents as many assumed, but pickup trucks (37%) caused the majority of accidents in 2020 and 2021, followed by a category of private and public vehicles (27 per cent).

On the Second Day of New Years Holiday 74 Killed in 586 Road Accidents

Key interesting statistics from the ministry’s Data Catalogue include:

Types of vehicles in accidents:

– Pickups (37%)

– Private and public vehicles (27%)

– Motorcycles (20%)

– Trucks with at least 10 wheels (8%)

– Six-wheel trucks (6%)

– Vans (2%)

Types of roads where most accidents happened:

– Straight-ahead roads without slope (70%)

– Curves without slope (13%)

– Curves with slope (8%)

– Bridges to commercial venues (3%)

– Intersections (1%)

Types of accidents:

– Overturning on or skidding off straight-ahead roads (43%)

– Rear crash (31%)

– Overturning or skidding off curved roads (13%)

– Head-on crashes (5%)

– Crashing into traffic barriers (4%)

– Crashing at intersections (2%)

– Hitting pedestrians (2%)

Causes of accidents:

– Violation of speed limit (78%)

– Being cut in front by pedestrians, vehicles or animals (8%)

– Falling asleep behind wheel (4%)

– Drunk driving (3%)

– Violations of traffic lights or signs or vehicles malfunctioning (2%)

– Unlawfully overtaking other vehicles, not allowing vehicles on main road to pass first, or not familiar with roads (1%).

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