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Police Officer Shot By His Angry Pregnant 4th Wife

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Police Officer Shot By His Pregnant 4th Wife

On Saturday, a pregnant woman shot a police officer at the Phra Khanong station in Bangkok. The pregnant woman was later identified as one of the police officers’ several wives.

The incident occurred shortly after midnight on Saturday, when Pol Lt Col Kasityos Phraekhao strolled out for a cigarette behind the police station and was approached by the woman.

Fellow police officers said they heard the two arguing loudly before the woman shot him on the left side.

The injured cop fled inside to the police station, where on-duty officers assisted him and convinced the distraught woman to surrender.

The pregnant woman has subsequently been charged with attempted murder of a law enforcement officer and illegal possession of a handgun.

The police officer was sent to the Police General Hospital in Bangkok, where his condition is stable.

Initial investigations indicate that the lady responsible for the shooting was the fourth of the officer’s four spouses.

His first wife reportedly passed away.

The superintendent of the Phra Kanong police station, Pol Col Vajirakorn Wongboon, stated that the incident was a domestic matter and should not tarnish the reputation of the police force.

Marital infidelity in Thailand

In 2021, both the Royal Thai Army (RTA) and the Royal Thai Police announced that members caught cheating on their spouses would face disciplinary action.

Harsher disciplinary action would be imposed if the offence is repeated or there are indicators of domestic violence.

Cheated-on spouses may also come forward and demand assistance, including child support withdrawn directly from the husband’s pay.

According to guidelines established by the Civil Service Commission, civil officials caught participating in extramarital affairs could be fired and also lose their state pension.

This norm applies to common-law relationships as well.

The law also protects relationships beyond police or military service. According to legal authorities, a legally married spouse may seek compensation from a third party (mistress or paramour) of the husband.

However, the legal case must be filed within one year of discovering the affair.

There is a six-month limit for the court to render a judgement, and it is possible to utilize romantic texts or damning images as evidence.

If the lawsuit is supported by substantial evidence, the defendant will be ordered to compensate the spouse. The court will also determine the final amount of compensation or price for the emotional distress.

In addition, the plaintiff can claim damages without divorcing their spouse and can file a second complaint if the affair persists.

Under the condition of secrecy, divorced wives have disclosed that they received six-figure compensation from the courts.

Even though Thai law protects marriages, condom producer Durex discovered in a 2012 poll of 29,000 persons from 36 nations that Thais are the most unfaithful nationality.

In its survey on infidelity, the dating service Match.com found comparable results.

The Thai attitude toward marital fidelity is possibly best exemplified by the steady stream of celebrity “scandals” making headlines. It is no secret that many prominent Thais choose to have multiple partners.

Polygamy was accepted in Thailand for centuries before its prohibition in 1935, a few years after the Siamese Revolution of 1932.

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