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67-Year-Old Man Attacked and Killed Pit Bulls

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Owner of 7 Pit Bulls Attacked and Killed By His Own Dogs

A man who was raising seven Pit bulls in his home died after being mauled by one or two of the dogs on Saturday in Northeastern Thailand, according to a member of the rescue team.

Natdanai Kosungnoen stated that after being alerted to the situation, the rescue team hurried to the man’s house in Nakhon Ratchasima province in northeastern Thailand.

The house owner, Boonserm Muang-iam, 67, was discovered unconscious in front of the house with dog bites all over his body. He had blood gushing from ruptured veins in his right arm and both thighs.

When the rescuers arrived, all of the dogs were in cages.

The responders attempted CPR on the man for nearly 20 minutes but were unsuccessful. Mr. Boonserm was taken to Maharat Nakhon Ratchasima Hospital and pronounced dead.

Mr. Boonserm’s son, Sanan Muang-ian, 34, said his father raised a total of seven dogs.

Four of the Pit bulls were mature – three females and one male – while the other three were three-month-old puppies born from one of the females.

On Saturday, he went to the market to get some groceries, leaving his father at home alone.

When he returned home, he discovered his father in a pool of blood. He assumed his father had been bitten by one or more of the larger dogs while attempting to stop them from fighting.

Owner of 7 Pit Bulls Attacked and Killed By His Own Dogs

Pit bulls Always kept in cages

Mr. Sanan stated that the dogs are usually kept in cages. They were only allowed out of the cages on rare occasions, and they had never attacked anyone before.

A string of pit bull assaults on people, some fatal, have sparked concerns about the safety of keeping these so-called dangerous animals as pets.

In one well-publicized incident, the victim was a family member of the Pit bull owner, while in another incident, the attack victim was a neighbour who was walking near a breeders house late at night when two of his pit bulls that were loose from their cages savagely attacked.

The dogs with their enormous skulls and powerful jaws, make many people feel unsafe when they see this species in public spaces like parks or pathways.

One woman told CTN News that she feels unsafe every time she sees this breed of dog in the park, not even the presence of its owner having them on a leash helps.

“I was so afraid [when I see a pit bull] I get away from them as fast as I can,” she told CTN News.

“They are just too powerful for most people to manage. I’m Also very sure you can guess what happens if the dog is set loose and leaps at someone, “She said.

Most importantly, we don’t know whether or not the Pit bull has been properly trained. I’d feel a lot more secure if these dogs were muzzled.

Because of the pit bull horror stories in Thailand and abroad, some owners have abandoned their pets and placed them in dog shelters.

Owner of 7 Pit Bulls Attacked and Killed By His Own Dogs

Should we be afraid of Pit bulls?

“Well, pit bulls are fighters,” says Pit Bull Zone Club founder Nathapoan Supatana.

We keep our pets on leashes when we go out in public to avoid making a spectacle, such as fighting with other dogs. Pit bulls, like any other dog breed, can be hostile to strangers.

Nathapoan attributes the terrible instances involving pit bulls to the owners’ lack of responsibility.

He also stated that the majority of pit bull attacks occur while the owners are gone, leaving the dogs with people who aren’t “authoritative” enough and hence unable to handle the animals.

The dogs are a powerful breed. Furthermore, in the wild, dogs instinctively form packs, he added. Dogs’ inherent behaviours might cause the dominant dog to feel more authoritative and seek control when the owner is not there, and they will compete to become the leader of the group.

When the owner is away, it is not uncommon for this breed of dog to acquire a competitive attitude against other persons residing in the house.

Pit bulls were originally imported into Thailand about 20 years ago when people who had lived abroad came home, according to Nathapoan.

As the breed grew in popularity, people with little or no knowledge about pit bulls aspired to own them, which sparked the problem.

“Many individuals want to show off their strong dog. Others, on the other hand, purposefully breed their dogs to be aggressive.

They are an active breed and require a lot of physical activity.

Over 5,000 people have joined the Pit Bull Zone Club. Every Sunday, the club hosts an obedience training session at a canine training centre on Krung Thep Kritha Road.

There the link between a canine and its owner is reinforced via exciting activities, including running, swimming, and obedience training at no cost.

Many countries have dangerous dog regulations and strict enforcement, ranging from bans to muzzles or leashes, as well as requiring all pit bull owners to acquire costly liability insurance before they can obtain a dog ownership license.

According to Dr. Pranee Panichabhongse, a senior veterinarian at the Department of Livestock Development in Thailand, importing American pit bulls has been prohibited since 2005, and the canines raised presently are those bred in Thailand.

These canines, as well as bull terriers, Staffordshire bull terriers, Rottweilers, and Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian fighting dogs), are on Thailand’s regulated dog list.

Owners of these controlled dogs, like owners of other pet dogs, must register their canines with the city’s local district office, according to the veterinarian. “The legislation demands that dogs be kept on a leash and muzzled in public places at all times.”

The senior veterinary officer acknowledged that pet restrictions in Thailand are not effectively followed, and canines without muzzles are widespread on the street.

She insisted that canine owners implant their dogs with microchips, as required under pet control legislation. “If the dog is on the loose, we can find the owner,” she explained.

The agency has received a number of pit bull-related complaints, according to Dr. Pranee. Some owners do not wish to retain their dogs any longer and request that the department do so.

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