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Tesla EV Charger Becomes A New Standard In North America

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In North America, Tesla has a network of chargers that, for the most part, can only charge Tesla automobiles as one of its main competitive advantages. According to Tesla, there are two times as many Tesla chargers as so-called CCS chargers, the kind used by Ford, General Motors, Audi, Rivian, and other automakers. Currently, Tesla is inviting other automakers to design vehicles with charging ports compatible with its charging format as well as other charging businesses, such as EVGo, ChargePoint, and Electrify America, to upgrade their chargers with Tesla-style plugs. However, it's not yet known if or when other businesses will decide to accept Tesla's offer. With a straightforward adapter that slips over the charging connector, Tesla owners have had access to CCS chargers for a long time. But having a Tesla-style charging cord would simplify the procedure and eliminate the need to buy an adaptor. Tesla has now given the cord the name "North American Charging Standard," or NACS, though it is not an official designation by any government body. The ability to utilise a Tesla Supercharger, the company's term for its rapid chargers, for non-Tesla vehicles has been more challenging and at best calls for a specialised adapter acquired from another business. Due to variations in how cars connect with the charger, it might not function even then. Driving a vehicle with a NACS charging port in the Tesla design will make it much simpler. But to date, neither manufacturers nor charging businesses have indicated they intend to accept Tesla's offer, which was made public in a blog post on Friday. The business and its CEO, Elon Musk, have previously discussed making its charging network available to vehicles other than Teslas. The business started doing this in Europe, where Tesla vehicles come with European-specific CCS-style charging connections, which are the industry standard. The charging company EVGo offered a temporary offer for Tesla drivers with a CCS adapter to use EVGo fast charging stations without paying monthly subscription costs on the same day Tesla unveiled its offer for other businesses to utilise its charging format. Tesla drivers can utilise the EVGo phone app to plug in and instantly begin a charging session under the current Autocharge+ EVGo plan. According to EVGo Commercial Officer Jonathan Levy, the timing of the company's promotional release was accidental, and there are no current plans for EVGo to begin installing Tesla charging cables at its stations. In the past, Tesla has offered to let other businesses utilise certain technologies that are protected by Tesla patents, but doing so required that they follow Tesla's "Patent Pledge." In order to use any Tesla technology, businesses had to sign an agreement stating that they would not sue Tesla or assist any other business in doing the same. This effectively turned Tesla's offer of intellectual sharing into a two-way street. It's not clear if the use of the NACS charging standard is covered by Tesla's Patent Pledge. Tesla, which ordinarily doesn't reply to inquiries from the media, didn't respond to emails on the subject. The Society of Automotive Engineers' (SAE) editorial director, Bill Visnic, asserted that he would not anticipate automakers accepting Tesla's offer. CCS is a standard that was created by the SAE and a group of automakers. He said that "a lot of significant work and collaboration" had gone into it. But even Visnic acknowledged that Tesla chargers are frequently more dependable and user-friendly than conventional public chargers. Since Tesla already has a larger network of chargers and many Tesla drivers can easily use an adapter, Visnic predicted that charging companies will want to keep their chargers using the CCS standard. (Some Tesla models are incompatible with CCS adapters.) However, Jim Burness, CEO of National Car Charging, a reseller of equipment to the EV charging sector, suggested that charging businesses could wish to add these cables since it might attract new clients. Burness drives a Tesla for personal use. Because the socket is already there on the station, he said, "this will help owners of the older Teslas who would otherwise have to not only buy an adaptor, but also pay for a retrofit of their car." The business claims to have changed the name of their charging connector to the North American Charging Standard (NACS) and contends that this standard is preferable to CCS because of its greater technology and geographic reach.

(CTN NEWS) – In North America, Tesla’s biggest competitive advantage has been its network of charging stations that, for the most part, can only charge Tesla cars.

According to Tesla, there are two times as many Tesla chargers as so-called CCS chargers used by Ford, General Motors, Audi, Rivian, and other automakers.

Currently, Tesla is inviting other automakers to design vehicles with charging ports compatible with its charging format as well as other charging businesses, such as EVGo, ChargePoint, and Electrify America, to upgrade their chargers with Tesla-style plugs.

However, it’s not yet known if or when other businesses will decide to accept Tesla’s offer.

With a straightforward adapter that slips over the charging connector, Tesla owners have had access to CCS chargers for a long time.But having a Tesla-style charging cord would simplify the procedure and eliminate the need to buy an adaptor.

Tesla has now given the cord the name “North American Charging Standard,” or NACS, though it is not an official designation by any government body.

In North America, Tesla has a network of chargers that, for the most part, can only charge Tesla automobiles as one of its main competitive advantages. According to Tesla, there are two times as many Tesla chargers as so-called CCS chargers, the kind used by Ford, General Motors, Audi, Rivian, and other automakers. Currently, Tesla is inviting other automakers to design vehicles with charging ports compatible with its charging format as well as other charging businesses, such as EVGo, ChargePoint, and Electrify America, to upgrade their chargers with Tesla-style plugs. However, it's not yet known if or when other businesses will decide to accept Tesla's offer. With a straightforward adapter that slips over the charging connector, Tesla owners have had access to CCS chargers for a long time. But having a Tesla-style charging cord would simplify the procedure and eliminate the need to buy an adaptor. Tesla has now given the cord the name "North American Charging Standard," or NACS, though it is not an official designation by any government body. The ability to utilise a Tesla Supercharger, the company's term for its rapid chargers, for non-Tesla vehicles has been more challenging and at best calls for a specialised adapter acquired from another business. Due to variations in how cars connect with the charger, it might not function even then. Driving a vehicle with a NACS charging port in the Tesla design will make it much simpler. But to date, neither manufacturers nor charging businesses have indicated they intend to accept Tesla's offer, which was made public in a blog post on Friday. The business and its CEO, Elon Musk, have previously discussed making its charging network available to vehicles other than Teslas. The business started doing this in Europe, where Tesla vehicles come with European-specific CCS-style charging connections, which are the industry standard. The charging company EVGo offered a temporary offer for Tesla drivers with a CCS adapter to use EVGo fast charging stations without paying monthly subscription costs on the same day Tesla unveiled its offer for other businesses to utilise its charging format. Tesla drivers can utilise the EVGo phone app to plug in and instantly begin a charging session under the current Autocharge+ EVGo plan. According to EVGo Commercial Officer Jonathan Levy, the timing of the company's promotional release was accidental, and there are no current plans for EVGo to begin installing Tesla charging cables at its stations. In the past, Tesla has offered to let other businesses utilise certain technologies that are protected by Tesla patents, but doing so required that they follow Tesla's "Patent Pledge." In order to use any Tesla technology, businesses had to sign an agreement stating that they would not sue Tesla or assist any other business in doing the same. This effectively turned Tesla's offer of intellectual sharing into a two-way street. It's not clear if the use of the NACS charging standard is covered by Tesla's Patent Pledge. Tesla, which ordinarily doesn't reply to inquiries from the media, didn't respond to emails on the subject. The Society of Automotive Engineers' (SAE) editorial director, Bill Visnic, asserted that he would not anticipate automakers accepting Tesla's offer. CCS is a standard that was created by the SAE and a group of automakers. He said that "a lot of significant work and collaboration" had gone into it. But even Visnic acknowledged that Tesla chargers are frequently more dependable and user-friendly than conventional public chargers. Since Tesla already has a larger network of chargers and many Tesla drivers can easily use an adapter, Visnic predicted that charging companies will want to keep their chargers using the CCS standard. (Some Tesla models are incompatible with CCS adapters.) However, Jim Burness, CEO of National Car Charging, a reseller of equipment to the EV charging sector, suggested that charging businesses could wish to add these cables since it might attract new clients. Burness drives a Tesla for personal use. Because the socket is already there on the station, he said, "this will help owners of the older Teslas who would otherwise have to not only buy an adaptor, but also pay for a retrofit of their car." The business claims to have changed the name of their charging connector to the North American Charging Standard (NACS) and contends that this standard is preferable to CCS because of its greater technology and geographic reach.

The ability to utilize a Tesla Supercharger, the company’s term for its rapid chargers, for non-Tesla vehicles has been more challenging. At best, it calls for a specialized adapter acquired from another business.

Due to variations in how cars connect with the charger, it might not function even then.

Driving a vehicle with a NACS charging port in the Tesla design will make it much simpler. But to date, neither manufacturers nor charging businesses have indicated they intend to accept Tesla’s offer, which was made public in a blog post on Friday.

The business and its CEO, Elon Musk, have previously discussed making its charging network available to vehicles other than Teslas.

The business started doing this in Europe, where Tesla vehicles come with European-specific CCS-style charging connections, which are the industry standard.

The charging company EVGo offered a temporary offer for Tesla drivers with a CCS adapter to use EVGo fast charging stations without paying monthly subscription costs on the same day Tesla unveiled its offer for other businesses to utilize its charging format.

Tesla drivers can utilise the EVGo phone app to plug in and instantly begin a charging session under the current Autocharge+ EVGo plan. According to EVGo Commercial Officer Jonathan Levy, the timing of the company’s promotional release was accidental, and there are no current plans for EVGo to begin installing Tesla charging cables at its stations.

In the past, Tesla offered to let other businesses utilize certain technologies protected by Tesla patents, but doing so required that they follow Tesla’s “Patent Pledge.”

To use any Tesla technology, businesses had to sign an agreement stating that they would not sue Tesla or assist any other business in doing the same. This effectively turned Tesla’s offer of intellectual sharing into a two-way street.

It’s unclear if Tesla’s Patent Pledge covers using the NACS charging standard. Tesla, which ordinarily doesn’t reply to inquiries from the media, didn’t respond to emails on the subject.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) editorial director, Bill Visnic, asserted that he would not anticipate automakers accepting Tesla’s offer. CCS is a standard created by the SAE and a group of automakers.

He said “a lot of important work and collaboration” had gone into it.

But even Visnic acknowledged that Tesla chargers are frequently more dependable and user-friendly than conventional public chargers.

Since Tesla already has a larger network of chargers and many Tesla drivers can easily use an adapter, Visnic predicted that charging companies will want to keep their chargers using the CCS standard. (Some Tesla models are incompatible with CCS adapters.)

However, Jim Burness, CEO of National Car Charging, a reseller of equipment to the EV charging sector, suggested that charging businesses could wish to add these cables since it might attract new clients. Burness drives a Tesla for personal use.

Because the socket is already there on the station, he said, “this will help owners of the older Teslas who would otherwise have to not only buy an adaptor but also pay for a repair of their car.”

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