Connect with us

News

21-Year-Old Student Falls to His Death Climbing Over Balcony

Published

on

21-Year-Old Student Falls to His Death

On early Sunday morning, a 21-year-old student fell to his death from the sixth floor of a condominium building in this northern province after climbing down to the balcony below in pursuit of his girlfriend.

The incident was reported to the police around 3 a.m. Thanapop Chantharawong was discovered dead behind a building in Moo 4 village, tambon Ban Klong, Muang district. He was dressed in a blue jersey with green shorts. Thanapop, a Phetchabun native, was a student at Pibulsongkram Rajabhat University in Phitsanulok.

His 27-year-old girlfriend told cops they had drinks at a restaurant in the Muang district. They argued their way to her condo.

When they returned to the room, the argument continued. When the man returned from downstairs to apologize to a security guard, his girlfriend had locked him out.

The security guard observed the man attempting to enter his girlfriend’s room via CCTV. He then summoned a locksmith and gained entry to the room.

At that point, the woman climbed over her balcony and lowered herself to the balcony of the room below, where an occupant rescued her. Her boyfriend, on the other hand, attempted to climb down after her and fell five stories to his death, according to the woman.

The man who lived on the fifth floor said that after hearing noises from the floor above, he saw the woman standing on his balcony railing and drew her inside before hearing something hit the ground.

Grad Student Caught Using GhostWriter

Grad Student Caught Using GhostWriter

Meanwhile, the Ministry of Higher Education, Science, Research, and Innovation (MHESI) has ordered all universities in the country to check on their lecturers to see if any purchased academic papers were used, following reports of ghostwriting at least two well-known universities.

The order was issued in response to a recent report about academics who renamed paid-for reports and claimed ownership, even publishing them in internationally accredited journals.

According to reports, a grad student at Chiang Mai University published an academic paper on nanomaterials that he allegedly purchased and then paid another 30,000 baht in publishing costs. He also claimed to have written essays for several other works in fields other than his own, such as farming and cryptocurrency.

The ministry stated that it would continue to assist researchers in writing papers that benefit the nation’s reputation but would focus more on scrutinizing academic journals and providing ethical oversight.

The president of Khon Kaen University, Dr. Charnchai Panthongviriyakul, responded by saying that the university has instructed its graduate school and other bodies to scrutinize student research papers and root out any suspected cases of ghostwriting or plagiarism.

According to Dr. Charnchai, an investigation is currently underway focusing on researchers and students who authored numerous works or reports in fields outside their areas of expertise.

He added that experts in relevant fields would also review research papers before publication.

According to Dr. Charnchai, some researchers may exploit a flaw in the university’s inspection mechanism that excludes certain types of journals. While these constitute less than 1% of all university research, suspect content can still harm a school’s reputation and credibility.

“This is a serious situation. Ethical violations by researchers are considered serious offenses and are punishable, “He stated.

Somchai Preechasinlapakun, a Chiang Mai University’s Faculty of Law lecturer, believes the country should reconsider how grad students are evaluated to weed out bad apples.

 

Continue Reading