FDA Orders Massive Recall On Eye Drops Over Bacterial Contamination
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FDA Orders Massive Recall on Eye Drops Over Bacterial Contamination

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FDA Orders Massive Recall on Eye Drops Over Bacterial Contamination

The United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has enlarged the list of eye drops recalled in 2023 due to the possibility of bacterial contamination. The new federal safety agency recall includes store-brand items sold at major retailers.

Kilitch Healthcare India recalled the items due to “safety concerns” discovered by FDA investigators at the manufacturing plant.

In late October, the FDA issued a warning to consumers about the “risk of eye infections that could result in partial vision loss or blindness” in relation to the now-recalled items. According to the FDA’s warning, inspectors discovered germs in samples obtained from the manufacturing plant.

The FDA stated that CVS, Rite Aid, and Target were removing the goods from store shelves and websites, so many of the eye drops are likely no longer available.

The recall notice encouraged distributors and merchants to cease selling the products and to return them to consumers.

Kilitch Healthcare India Limited, the items’ producer, announced a voluntary recall of the eye drops on Wednesday. As of yet, the business has received no reports of adverse occurrences associated with the drops, but customers should cease using them and return them to the site where they were acquired.

You should see a doctor if you have signs of an eye infection. The FDA issued the initial warning after inspectors discovered bacteria and “insanitary conditions” in the production plant.

Over-the-counter eye drops

Several additional types of artificial tears and eye drops have been recalled this year due to bacterial and fungal contamination, a lack of sterility, and potentially hazardous preservatives.

EzriCare and Delsam Pharma, for example, were linked to an antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria that can cause eye infections. The FDA also issued warning letters about the use of silver as a preservative in some eye drops sold by CVS and Walgreens.

Over-the-counter eye drops are simple to use and widely available at pharmacies and large-box stores. But, given recent recalls, are yours safe to use?

The US Food and Drug Administration cautioned customers last month not to buy specific types of eye drops from CVS, Rite Aid, or Target store brands because they could cause eye infections that result in “partial vision loss or blindness.” The caution also includes eye drops from Walmart (Equate brand), Cardinal Health’s Leader and Rugby brands, and Velocity Pharma, totaling more than 20 products.

Kilitch Healthcare India Limited, the items’ producer, announced a voluntary recall of the eye drops on Wednesday. As of yet, the business has received no reports of adverse occurrences associated with the drops, but customers should cease using them and return them to the site where they were acquired. You should see a doctor if you have signs of an eye infection.

The FDA issued the initial warning after inspectors discovered bacteria and “insanitary conditions” in the production plant.

Several additional types of artificial tears and eye drops have been recalled this year due to bacterial and fungal contamination, a lack of sterility, and potentially hazardous preservatives.

EzriCare and Delsam Pharma, for example, were linked to an antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria that can cause eye infections. The FDA also issued warning letters about the use of silver as a preservative in some eye drops sold by CVS and Walgreens.

However, there are still safe eye drops available that help alleviate a variety of ailments. Here’s what you need to know about buying and applying eye drops safely.

Eye drops are used to treat a wide range of ailments, from slight irritants to persistent vision issues. Optometrists and ophthalmologists provide them to patients to assist them heal after surgery and to avoid infections.

Many of them are available over the counter to treat dry eyes or an allergy flare-up.

With so many alternatives available, thorough research is essential to ensure you select the proper eye drops to treat your specific eye conditions. Ingredients differ greatly depending on the type of eye drop, and using the incorrect type of drop can cause more issues than it helps.

Different kinds of eye drops

Some eye drops are available without a prescription, while others require one. The following are the most often used eye drops:

Lubricating drops, often known as artificial tears, are intended to alleviate dryness as well as any related redness or irritation. Polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol are two common active substances. These drops are heavier and come in gel or ointment form for use at night.

Antihistamine drops: Antihistamine drops reduce itching, redness, and other irritation caused by allergic reactions to allergens such as pollen or pet dander. There are various alternatives on the market, and the active ingredients differ depending on the brand. Ketifen, olopatadine, carboxymethylcellulose, and glycerin are all common components.

Anti-redness eye drops: These eye drops typically contain tetrahydrozoline or brimonidine to minimize the swelling of your eye’s blood vessels. They’re meant to be used sparingly.

Antibiotic eye drops: These prescription eye drops cure infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, such as pink eye or corneal ulcers. Gentamicin sulfate and ciprofloxacin are two common medications.

Steroid eye drops: Steroid eye drops are used to treat inflammation symptoms such as swelling and redness, such as after eye surgery.

Drops for treating certain health conditions: Eye doctors may administer a variety of additional types of eye drops to treat disorders such as myopia and glaucoma.

Going to a specialist rather than choosing out eye drops yourself is one method to prevent concerns with recalled over-the-counter brands. In fact, you should always consult with your eye doctor to determine the best type to purchase and how to wear them securely.

Eye Drop Retailers and Product Information

Retailer/Brand

Product

Product Information

National Drug Code (NDC)

CVS Health Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (single pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 0.5% 76168-702-15
CVS Health Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (twin pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 0.5% 76168-702-30
CVS Health Lubricant Gel Drops 15 ml (single pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 1% 76168-704-15
CVS Health Lubricant Gel Drops 15 ml (twin pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 1% 76168-704-30
CVS Health Multi-Action Relief Drops 15 ml Polyvinyl Alcohol 0.5%, Povidone 0.6%, and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride 0.05% 76168-706-15
CVS Health Lubricant Gel drops 10 ml Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.4% and Propylene Glycol 0.3% 76168-712-10
CVS Health Lubricant Eye Drops 10 ml (single pack) Propylene Glycol 0.6% 76168-714-10
CVS Health Lubricant Eye Drops 10 ml (twin pack) Propylene Glycol 0.6% 76168-714-20
CVS Health Mild Moderate Lubricating Eye Drops 15 ml (single pack) Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.25% 76168-711-15
Leader (Cardinal Health) Eye Irritation Relief 0.5 FL OZ (15 ml) Polyvinyl Alcohol 0.5%, Povidone 0.6% and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride 0.05% 70000-0087-1
Leader (Cardinal Health) Dry Eye Relief 0.5 FL OZ (15 ml) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 1% 70000-0089-1
Leader (Cardinal Health) Lubricant Eye Drops 0.5 FL OZ (15 ml) (single) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 0.5% 70000-0090-1
Leader (Cardinal Health) Lubricant Eye Drops 0.5 FL OZ (15 ml) (twin pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 0.5% 70000-0090-2 (carton)

70000-0090-1 (bottle)

Leader (Cardinal Health) Dry Eye Relief 0.33 FL OZ (10 ml) Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.4% and Propylene Glycol 0.3% 70000-0088-1
Leader (Cardinal Health) Lubricant Eye Drops 0.33 FL OZ (10 ml) Polyethylene Glycol 0.6% 70000-0587-1
Rugby (Harvard Drug Group) Lubricating Eye Drops 0.5 oz (15 ml) Polyvinyl Alcohol 1.4% 0536-1325-94
Rugby (Harvard Drug Group) Lubricating Tears Eye Drops 0.5 oz (15 ml) Dextran/Hypromellose 0.1%/0.3% 0536-1282-94
Rite Aid Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (twin pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 0.5% 11822-9707-5
Rite Aid Lubricant Eye Drops 10 ml (twin pack) Propylene Glycol 0.6% 11822-4811-3
Rite Aid Gentle Lubricant Gel Eye Drops 15 ml Hypromellose 0.3%, Glycerin 0.2%, Dextran 70 0.1% Not provided by the manufacturer
Rite Aid Lubricant Gel Drops 15 ml Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 1% 11822-9706-5
Rite Aid Lubricating Gel Drops 10 ml Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.4% and Propylene Glycol 0.3% 11822-4540-3
Rite Aid Multi-Action Relief Drops 15 ml Polyvinyl Alcohol 0.5%, Povidone 0.6% and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride 0.05% 11822-2254-3
Target Up&Up Dry Eye Relief 15 ml Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.4% and Propylene Glycol 0.3% 76168-800-30
Target Up&Up High Performance Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (single pack) Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.4% and Propylene Glycol 0.3% 11673-522-15
Target Up&Up High Performance Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (twin pack) Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium 0.5% 11673-522-30
Velocity Pharma LLC Lubricant Eye Drop 10 ml (triple pack) Propylene Glycol 0.6% 76168-502-30
Walmart Equate Hydration PF Lubricant Eye Drop 10 mL Polyethylene Glycol 400 0.4% and Propylene Glycol 0.3% 79903-168-01
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