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Email Marketing Guide: How to Write a Thank You Email

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Thank you, email, marketing

Thank you are simple words that still possess great power of building a more friendly communication and a nice way to end an email. A purchase isn’t the only thing you might be thanking your customers for.

Subscription, registration, event attendance, charity participation, feedback, review on third platforms, membership anniversaries, social sharing – there are many reasons to express your gratitude. Birthdays and holidays also make a good cause to come up with a warm and sincere thank you email. We’re sure you have such campaigns in your email marketing strategy, but if not, it’s high time to launch some. And we’ll show how to get started.

 

  • Write a related subject line

 

An email subject line should be original, grab the attention, and prompt people to open your message. However, when it comes to thank you emails, it’s better to stick to proven classics and avoid too fancy language. Creativity is surely great but keep it for your next promos.

In the thank you email subject line write the reason you’re writing outright: Hi, John, Thanks for being amazing; Thanks for subscribing; Thanks for connecting with us; Thanks for making our company awesome, Big thanks for a big commitment, etc. Let people know it’s not a regular campaign but rather a friendly message without hidden commercial intentions.

When you’re celebrating some major milestones or achievements that can be expressed in numbers, consider including those in the subject line as well: Thank you for using Our Company for 5 years!; Thanks to you, we’ve donated $500,000 this year!; Thanks for helping us reach 1,000,000 downloads.

Such mentions add value to the email and let the subscriber feel they’re part of something big and significant, thus strengthening the customer loyalty.

 

  • Address by the name

 

A thank you email is a good place for personal addressing. While the name put in bulk promos may look out of place (because they are sent to all subscribers and have nothing to do with the particular reader), the name in the thank you email makes it personal and custom.

it’s especially applicable to triggered emails sent in response to a certain action, like subscription or purchase.

 

  • Create a concise meaningful copy

 

Typically, in the thank you email you need to cover three positions:

  • what you’re thankful for;
  • why it matters to you and to the recipient;
  • what incentives you have to offer as a gift.

Of course, you may opt in for a different structure depending on the type of your current email. The only mandatory point is the explanation of you writing this message; the rest is optional. You may keep it short with one sentence only or write an extensive copy enlisting all the achievements.

The main thing is to follow the line. A thank you email isn’t about you; it’s about your customer and their journey, so don’t steal the show. Using such phrases like we did, we achieved, our brand reached, we want, we plan, we accomplished in every second sentence turns a thank you email into a thank us email.

 

  • Offer a proper gift

 

If applicable to a particular thank you campaign, offer your customers a thank-you gift. It may be anything, from #% off the next order to holiday package or wrapping. The thing to remember with thank-you gifts is that the recipient has to be able to actually use it.

There is no use in offering free international shipping to local customers. Single travelers would hardly find family booking discounts lucrative, and families with kids will have to pay extra to make use of your discount one-person ski pass, eliminating the whole idea of the present.

The thank-you gift should be valuable and shouldn’t imply any hidden charges. To make such gifts, you need to segment your contact base and come with different strategies for different customer groups. That will help more personalized email marketing campaigns, including thank you emails as well.

 

  • Avoid too many CTA

 

There is a time for product promotion and there is a time for a less commercial approach. A thank you email is usually not a place for numerous calls to action. And those you do include should resonate with the overall message.

When you thank for newsletter subscription, it’s normal to put one CTA inviting to explore the blog or recent articles. Also when you thank for registration in the system, it’s ok to include a link to the how-to-start guide or tutorials. But when you thank for, let’s say, product feedback or event attendance and include 5 CTAs within the two-sentence copy, it looks excessive.

 

  • Include related visuals

 

For visuals, follow the principle of relevance as well. Images of your product shouldn’t cover the whole copy. When you thank for review – consider adding user-generated photos from social media of other users who liked the product. When thanking for donations, include photos or video stories of people you helped or organizations you partner with. When thanking for a product purchase, include personal recommendations based on the customer’s browse history but avoid too aggressive advertising: in a thank you email, your task is to help and advise not directly prompt new sales.

 

  • Make a personal email signature

 

It’s better to send thank you emails on behalf of a person than the whole company. A campaign signed by Jack Smith, Senior Customer Experience Manager has a more human touch that signed by Company Name. And the whole idea of a thank you email is to prove to the subscriber they are receiving a message from a real person.

To sum up, a thank you email should be clear, personal, and expresses the brand’s appreciation. It’s not a place for extensive commercial offers and CTAs. Send thank you emails to show gratitude not to sell services. Use the informal language and personal email signature to make your messages look friendly and human-like.

Author’s Bio

Iuliia Nesterenko is a technical writer at eSputnik. Her focus is on exploring current digital marketing trends and describing new strategies for email marketers.