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Pomelo: Grapefruit’s Cousin

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Pomelo: Grapefruit's Cousin

(CTN News) – Ever walked into the Pomelo grocery store in the fall or winter and seen this huge green fruit nestled among its much smaller citrus cousins?

This humble citrus fruit is botanically related to grapefruit, and is a jolly green giant. Once you have tasted it, you will know it is worth bringing home.

Here are some things you should know about grapefruit if you are unfamiliar with them.

Can you tell me what grapefruit is?

Grapefruits (also known as pummels) are green, oblong citrus fruits that have bright pink interior flesh.

Because of their size and flavor, they are often compared to grapefruits, but grapefruits are actually a hybrid between grapefruits and oranges.

Grapefruit is the largest citrus fruit, ranging in size from a baby cantaloupe to almost the size of a basketball, according to Specialty Produce. In addition to being grown in warm regions of the western United States during the fall and spring, they also originated in southeastern Asia and Malaysia.

The flowers grow on tall trees that produce big, white flowers that are valued for their sweet fragrance and used to make perfume.

Despite their commonality and accessibility today, grapefruits were highly prized status symbols in Ancient Rome. Royal fruit!

What do pomelos taste like?

The first time you slice open a grapefruit, you may be amazed at how similar it appears to a grapefruit. There is a rosy pink color on the inside and a membranous structure.

In contrast to grapefruit, its pith is thicker and spongier. Likewise, its taste is similar, but it is sweeter and less tangy. Grapefruit may taste sweet or acidic, but it does not taste bitter, according to Specialty Produce.

It smells fresh, clean, and heavily floral, which contributes some floral notes to its flavor as well (a taste of springtime in the middle of winter!).

It is pulpy, juicy, and soft in texture, similar to most citrus fruits. The experience of eating grapefruit is familiar enough that it doesn’t seem strange, yet different enough that it is enjoyable.

Pomelo: How to Eat It

Since Pomelo it resembles grapefruit, it can be eaten in the same manner as grapefruit: by cutting it in half and scooping out the segments.

In light of grapefruit’s size, this may be the most convenient method, but you can also slice it as you would an orange. Do not discard the peel – it is so thick and fragrant that it is commonly candied.

Specialty Produce recommends pairing the pomelo fruit with Thai and Asian flavors, as well as seafood, garlic, chiles, peanuts, and coconut.

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