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Heart Disease Risk Can Be Reduced By Eating These 6 Foods

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Heart Disease Risk Can Be Reduced By Eating These 6 Foods

(CTN News) – Researchers found that diets low in six specific heart-healthy foods increase cardiovascular disease, heart attacks, and stroke risks in an ongoing, large-scale study.

People living in western countries have primarily been studied to determine which foods raise or lower cardiovascular disease risk.

Additionally, researchers used a combination of heart-healthy and potentially harmful ultra-processed foods to identify links between diet and heart health.

However, in a new study published on July 6 in European Heart Journal, researchers from the Population Research Health Institute (PHRI) developed a new healthy diet score — dubbed the PURE Healthy Diet Score — using data from participants from around the world, including those in low, middle, and high-income countries.

Aside from that, it focused on foods that are beneficial for heart disease.

PURE, the institute’s ongoing study involving 147,642 participants from 21 countries, provided these data.

Scientists applied the PURE Healthy Diet Score to five independent studies, involving 244,597 participants. Consuming more fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, moderate amounts of fish, and whole-fat dairy reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with and without vascular disease.

This was especially true in low-income countries where these foods are rarely consumed.

Furthermore, unprocessed meat and whole grains were also associated with similar outcomes.

The risk of major cardiovascular events and death was 6% lower in people with a 20% higher PURE Healthy Diet score.

It is likely that, worldwide, a healthy diet is one in which diverse natural foods are consumed in moderation rather than foods that are limited in variety.

There is a bigger problem of inadequate consumption of key healthy foods than overconsumption of certain nutrients or foods (like saturated fats, whole-fat dairy and meats—all of which are consumed in lower amounts with a lower diet score) when it comes to mortality and [cardiovascular disease] risk, according to the study authors.

“In light of the low intake of fats and saturated fats (i.e. whole-fat dairy) among people with the lowest diet scores […], it may not be warranted to restrict saturated fat and dairy consumption in many populations around the world,” they conclude.

Unprocessed red meat consumption may not negatively affect heart health if moderately consumed.

The six foods included in the PURE Healthy Diet Score should be consumed on average on a daily or weekly basis as follows:

  • Every day, consume two to three servings of fruit

  • A serving of vegetables per day should be two to three

  • Every day, eat one serving of nuts

  • A daily serving of dairy is recommended

  • Consume legumes three to four times a week

  • Fish at least twice a week

Additionally, you can substitute some of these foods with whole grains, unprocessed red meat, or poultry.

The results may have been affected by what the participants ate. Additionally, the researchers didn’t study individual fruits and veggies.

It’s important to note, however, that because the study involved nearly 245,000 people from 80 countries, the authors suggest the results can be applied to almost everyone, and individuals can adjust the diet recommendations based on what they can get and what they like.

A vegetarian diet can be adequate if they eat enough fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, whole grains, and dairy. Even non-vegetarians can score the same if they eat a lot of fruits, veggies, and legumes, as well as dairy, fish, and red meat.

SEE ALSO:

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS YOU SHOULD EAT DAILY

Salman Ahmad is a seasoned writer for CTN News, bringing a wealth of experience and expertise to the platform. With a knack for concise yet impactful storytelling, he crafts articles that captivate readers and provide valuable insights. Ahmad's writing style strikes a balance between casual and professional, making complex topics accessible without compromising depth.

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