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Chiang Rai Doctor Sacked for Calling Patient Stupid

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Chiang Rai Doctor Suspended Indefinitely for Calling Patient Stupid

According to the hospital, a doctor at Chiang Saen Hospital in Chiang Rai who was filmed yelling at a patient and calling her stupid has been suspended indefinitely.

The action occurred after the Public Health Ministry voiced worry about the harsh working circumstances of medical staff.

The Chiang Saen Hospital in Chiang Rai announced in a statement on Sunday that the doctor in question had been suspended indefinitely rather than for five days as originally instructed.

In addition, the hospital has launched an internal investigation into the incident.

The doctor could be seen sitting cross-legged on a chair, playing with a mobile phone while engaging in a verbal altercation with the patient and the patient’s relatives in a TikTok video on social media over the weekend.

The doctor can be heard calling the patient “Stupid” at one point in the TikTok video.

@sirilakjampa โรงพยาบาลเชียงแสน พยาบาลบางคน#โรงพยาบาลเชียงแสน #เชียงแสน ♬ เสียงต้นฉบับ – 🧸mai🧸

The patient, a 36-year-old pregnant lady, arrived at the hospital seeking treatment for nausea and vomiting, for which the physician gave an injection.

However, the patient refused the treatment because she was concerned that it would worsen her cardiac condition.

The altercation with the doctor erupted quickly.

Chiang Saen Hospital director Sookchai Theansavettrakul expressed remorse for the event, explaining that it was caused by a misunderstanding between the doctor and a patient and her relatives.

Following the hospital’s decision, the Public Health Ministry recognized the need to increase the doctor-patient ratio at hospitals across the country to relieve stress and pressure on the medical staff, particularly at state-run hospitals and other medical facilities.

chiang rai doctor

The ministry’s deputy permanent secretary, Taweesilp Visanuyothin, said the ministry would increase manpower in areas affected by medical staff shortages during the next five years to alleviate the problem.

Staff surveys will begin soon, focusing on the North and Northeast due to their huge populations.

Staff in regions where there are no shortages may be reassigned to other areas to assist balance the load, he said.

According to Yongyud Wongpiromsarn, an adviser to the Mental Health Department, medical staff are concerned about their stressful working conditions.

He believes safeguards should be implemented to avoid conflict between doctors and patients.

“No one can say who is correct or incorrect in this case,” he added, adding that hospitals should have a dedicated mental health facility for personnel.

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