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World Leaders Express Shock and Fear Over the Storming of US Capitol

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Leaders around the world condemned the storming of the U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump on Wednesday, expressing shock at the chaos unfolding in a country they once relied upon for global leadership.

“Disgraceful scenes in US Congress,” tweeted Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain. A staunch ally of the United States over generations. “The United States stands for democracy around the world and it is now vital that there should be a peaceful and orderly transfer of power.”

Other allies were also similarly appalled at what they described as an attack on American democracy. Though some said they believed U.S. democratic institutions would withstand the turmoil. Above all a number of leaders singled out Trump for harsh criticism.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also said his country was “deeply disturbed and saddened” by the events in the U.S., Canada’s closest ally and neighbor.

“Trump and his supporters should finally accept the decision of the American voters and stop trampling on democracy,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas wrote on Twitter. “From inflammatory words come violent deeds.” He added that “contempt for democratic institutions has disastrous effects.”

European Union

European Parliament President David Sassoli, who leads one of the largest legislatures in the world, also denounced the scenes at the Capitol. The European Union has spent four cantankerous years dealing with the Trump administration, and its top officials have repeatedly said they are looking forward to a better relationship under President-elect Joe Biden.

“This is insurrection. Nothing less. In Washington,” tweeted Carl Bildt, a former prime minister of Sweden.

Turkey, a NATO ally that has sometimes been at odds with Washington, expressed concern over the images of angry Trump supporters trying to thwart the certification of Biden as the new president. The chaos forced lawmakers to be rushed from the building.

A Turkish Foreign Ministry statement urged all parties in the United States to use “moderation and common sense.”

“We believe that the United States will overcome this domestic political crisis with maturity,” the ministry said.

“Violence will never succeed in overruling the will of the people. Democracy in the US must be upheld — and it will be,” Trudeau also tweeted.

Volkan Bozkir, president of the 193-member United Nations General Assembly, said he was saddened by the developments. But, he tweeted, ″I believe that peace & respect for democratic processes will prevail in our host country at this critical time.”

President Trump calls for protesters to go home

Meanwhile, after a protest at the U.S. Capitol became violent, President Donald Trump released a video on his Twitter feed calling for protesters to go home. He referred to his supporters as ‘very special’ but also kept up his attacks on the 2020 election saying it was “fraudulent.”

“We had an election that was stolen from us,” he said. “You have to go home now. We have to have peace.”

The video message was also posted on Facebook and YouTube, but it was removed from the social media channels.

“This is an emergency situation and we are taking appropriate emergency measures, including removing President Trump’s video,” Guy Rosen, Facebook vice president of integrity, said in a tweet.

“We removed it because on balance we believe it contributes to rather than diminishes the risk of ongoing violence,” Rosen also said.

Angry supporters of Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol with the goal of thwarting a peaceful transfer of power. The chaos also forced lawmakers to be rushed from the building and seek safety.

The first time Trump mentioned the protest was in a tweet sent out at 11:38 a.m. (PT).


About 45 minutes later, he put out another tweet with a restrained call for peace but he did not call on his supporters to leave. His video followed one hour later.

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