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Southern Thailand

Passenger Train Crashes into Car Killing Two Brothers

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Two men were killed instantly after a passenger train crashed into their car in the Southern province of Trang. The deadly crash occurred at an unmanned rail crossing in Kantang district on Friday afternoon.

Police and recuce workers found the wreckage of a Toyota Vios  with its left side badly damaged by the impact from the train. The passenger train was traveling from Trang station on the way to Kantang station to pick up passengers for Bangkok.

Two men, were identified later as driver Thotsaporn Sitthipan, 33 and his brother Sorawit, 25, both natives of Kantang. Both were found dead and their bodies trapped in the wreckage of the car.

Wiwat Amphan, 33, who witnessed the incident, said the car was trying to cross the track as the train was approaching. He and other residents in the area heard the train sound its horn but the car kept going.

The train crashed into the car and dragged it along the track for more than 800 meters.

State Railway Refuses to Pay for Crossing

Residents have pleaded with the State Railway of Thailand to install a railway barrier at this crossing, he said. Both sides are surrounded by rubber plantations making it hard for drivers to see trains.

Drivers only see the train when they arrive close to the crossing. This crossing is very dangerous,” Mr Wirwat told the Bangkok Post.

A source said Mr Sorawit worked at Vachira Phuket Hospital and had traveled back to Kantang district to get married on Oct 10. His elder brother had taken him out to buy cakes to take back to friends in Phuket before the fatal crash.

Thailand’s State Railway of Thailand (SRT) and local administrations have long been at odds over who should pay to install barriers and signals at unmanned crossings.

There is a general agreement that if a track crosses an existing road, the SRT should foot the bill for safety equipment. But if a newly built road crosses an existing rail track, barriers would be the responsibility of the agency that had the road built.

Source: Bangkok Post, Thairath


Photo’s of Train Crash Scene