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Rescue Worker Thwarts Suicide by Dressing Like Homeless Man

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A Chiang Mai rescue worker impersonating a homeless man has saved the life of a young student attempting to commit suicide from a pedestrian bridge.

Mr. Withawat Sinworasrithaweekhun, chief of a rescue team rushed to a passenger bridge in front of Chiang Mai‘s Maejo University late Sunday. After learning a young student was contemplating suicide.

There he found the university student sitting still on the edge overlooking traffic underneath. The young man did not utter a word even though police had tried for an hour to talk to him down.

Mr Withawat had a different idea. After changing his clothes into a dirty T-shirt and shorts, he walked barefoot to a rubbish bin near the depressed man and pretended to search the garbage.

Meanwhile, police kept talking to the young man to distract him as planned. Suddenly, Mr Withawat grabbed the man from behind, swiftly pulling him back to the pedestrian bridge onto his body so he did not hit the concrete floor.

Police brought the student to the Maejo station and contact his parents.

“I didn’t mean to be a hero but only want to save the young man. I made it thanks to the police who distracted him” Mr Withawat said.

Student Suicide Thailand

Recent research reveals a disturbing finding that over 6 per cent of university students have attempted suicide.

The study findings have been highlighted after several students killed themselves in recent weeks.

“From research on university students’ depression during the past three to four years, it can be concluded that 6.4 per cent of students turned suicidal and tried to take their own life,” said Asst Professor Dr Piyawan Visessuvanapoom, lecturer at the Chulalongkorn University’s Faculty of Education.

According to the research, most student suicide attempts were in dormitories or homes.

The common triggers for the actions were consequently quarrels with someone very close. Also learning problems and relationship issues.

“Health problems, anxiety, stress and poor ties with parents and friends contribute to depression,” Piyawan said.

“Given that half of university students’ lives were about studies, lecturers could play a role in preventing a descent into depression.”

Source: Bangkok Post, Thaiger

 


Video footage of Daring Rescue of Chiang Mai Student

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