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Northen Thailand

Dam Reservoirs Levels Critically Low in North, Northeast Despite Storms

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Authorities are concerned there might not be enough time to raise reservoirs levels in the dams before Thailand’s rain season officially ends in 37 days.

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Researchers have reported that rains have failed to raise water levels in the country’s four main dam reservoirs. Despite recent tropical storms which battered the North and Northeast.

Ministry of Higher Education, Science, Research and Innovation said 4 dams reservoirs which feed the country’s rice belt remain dangerously low.

The four dam are: the Bhumibol in Tak; the Sirikit in Uttaradit; the Kwai Noi Bamrung Dan in Phitsanulok; and the Pasak Jolasid in Lop Buri. All of which feed the country’s rice belt in the Chao Phraya river basin.

Researchers explained the dams currently store a combined 5.422 billion cubic metres of water. However, much more water is needed to last through next year’s dry season.

At least 12 billion cubic meters of water in the four dams are required for farming, consumption and sustaining ecology next summer.

Authorities are concerned there might not be enough time to raise levels in the dams before Thailand’s rain season officially ends in 37 days.

Storms Failed to Fill Dam Reservoirs

Tropical storms Podul and Kajiki, which hit the North and Northeast in recent weeks and caused widespread flooding. Especially in northeastern provinces including Ubon Ratchathani. Sadly the rains weren’t helpful in increasing the water in the four dams, according to local news reports.

Other major dams in the Northeast, such as the Ubol Ratana, Lam Phra Plerng; Lam Nang Rong and Thab Salao; were also reporting low water levels, according to the Bangkok Post news.

Only three of the countries major dams are almost full — the Vajiralongkorn dam in Kanchanaburi at 90% capacity; the Sirindhorn dam in Ubon Ratchathani (98%); and the Kaeng Krachan in Phetchaburi (83%).

Meanwhile, the Hydro Informatics Institute has predicted less rainfall nationwide. From Friday until Monday a high pressure trough from China will slowly push its way southward.