West Nile Virus Has Caused Two Deaths In The City

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West Nile Virus Has Caused Two Deaths In The City

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(CTN News) _ The Department of Public Health (DPH) of the City of El Paso confirmed two West Nile Virus (WNV) deaths on Tuesday morning.

It was reported that the two men were in their 60s and 70s, with underlying medical conditions and resided in the 79936 zip code,

Which is in the Far East El Paso area, as well as the 79907 zip code, which is in the Lower Valley area.

Mosquito bites are a nuisance to most people, but can be very serious for others, especially for those with medical conditions that impair their immune system’s ability to fight infection if the mosquito is carrying a disease like West Nile,” said Dr. Hector Ocaranza, a physician with the City-County Health Authority.

The threat of disease remains as long as mosquitoes bite in El Paso.”

There are several symptoms associated with West Nile, including fever, headache, fatigue, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and swollen lymph glands.

There is a high risk of serious illness among individuals over the age of 60, according to government officials.

A high risk also exists for individuals with certain medical conditions, such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease, and those who have undergone organ transplantation.

It is estimated that eight out of ten people who are infected with WNV will not develop symptoms.

One out of five people who are infected with West Nile fever develop a fever as well as body aches, joint pain, headaches and a rash.

An estimated one out of 150 infected individuals develops a severe illness that affects the central nervous system, and about one out of ten of these cases is fatal.

What are 3 signs of West Nile virus?

Symptoms of severe illness include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis.

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