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Arrest Warrants Issued for Suspected Insurgents Over Bangkok Bombing

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The alleged Muslim insurgents stand accused of being members of an unlawful syndicate. Collaborating to carry out or tell others to carry out terror attacks; and attempting to and having launched bomb attacks to harm others and damage others’ properties.

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BANGKOK – A Criminal Court has issued arrest warrants for five alleged Muslims insurgents suspected in bombing and arson attacks in Bangkok. Evidences against the alleged Muslim insurgents was presented to the court and arrest warrants were obtained.

The alleged Muslim insurgents stand accused of being members of an unlawful syndicate. Collaborating to carry out or tell others to carry out terror attacks; and attempting to and having launched bomb attacks to harm others and damage others’ properties.

The five alleged insurgents were identified as Manuden Samah, Muhammadadilan Saleh, Ariff Maseng, Sulkiflee Masameng and Ropae-ing Useng. Earlier, police investigators have also obtained arrest warrants against 13 other suspects.

Thailand’s PM Defends the Monitoring of Muslim University Students

Meanwhile, Thailand’s Prime Minister has defended police for requesting information about minority Muslim students from universities in Thailand.

His defense comes after criticism of the move as discriminatory and illegal.

Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha said the police request, which follows a series of bomb blasts in Bangkok in August that were blamed on Muslim suspects, was needed to build a national security database.

An official letter from police, shared online by former rights commissioner Angkhana Neelapaijit, asked a university to supply information about the numbers, place of origin, sect affiliation and other details about Muslim-organized student groups.

“This is an infringement on personal rights and a discrimination based on religion,” Angkhana said. Adding that freedom of religion and the right to privacy were guaranteed by the Thai constitution.

About 90% of Thais are Buddhist, though Muslims are a majority in three southern provinces bordering Malaysia.

Source: The Nation