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United States Voices Concerns as Thailand’s Road to Democracy Widens

US President Barack Obama shakes hands with Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha as they get in position for a group photo with other leaders at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Manila

US President Barack Obama shakes hands with Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha as they get in position for a group photo with other leaders at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Manila

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WASHINGTON – The United States has expressed deep frustration over the lack of democratic progress in Thailand after last year’s military coup, saying a new constitution there won’t pass the “smell test” unless civil society helps to draft it.

Political developments in Thailand came under congressional scrutiny Thursday as a Senate foreign relations panel examined the state of democracy in Southeast Asia.

State Department officials reported a mixed picture, with good news in Indonesia, the Philippines and former pariah state Myanmar after landmark elections this month, but bad news in Thailand, Malaysia and Cambodia.


Demanding democracy ... a woman screams at soldiers during an anti-coup protest in Bangkok.

Demanding democracy … a woman screams at soldiers during an anti-coup protest in Bangkok.


“We have seen backsliding of late. And of course millions of other Southeast Asians in countries like Laos and Vietnam continue to live under repressive and authoritarian governments,” said Scott Busby, deputy assistant secretary for democracy, human rights and labor.

The panel’s Republican chairman, Sen Cory Gardner, and Democratic Sen Ben Cardin voiced particular concern over long-standing US ally Thailand, where a May 2014 military takeover deposed an elected government after a prolonged political unrest. The ruling junta has squelched dissent. Washington has responded by restricting military aid.

James Carouso, director of the department’s office of Southeast Asian affairs, said the US is eager to restore full relations once civilian rule is restored, but it has been “incredibly frustrating” working with Thailand.


Thailand's Junta says election possibly in July 2017

Thailand’s Junta says election possibly in July 2017


The military has pushed back its schedule for elections until mid-2017, and there’s still uncertainty when a new constitution that can win popular approval will be in place to allow the elections to take place. In September, an unpopular draft constitution was scrapped. Last month, another junta-appointed panel was appointed to draft a new one.

“The Thai polity is in a state of stasis and we’re finding it hard to convince them to take the courageous step for them in writing a new constitution to let the people feel they can decide their future,” Mr Carouso said.

“Our main ask of them right now is to keep to the schedule and bring in civil society to help write the document or it’s not going to stand the smell test,” he said.

He said that Thailand has used its relationship with China as leverage to persuade the US not to push it too hard on reform but this wasn’t affecting US policy.

Meanwhile, Thailand and the United States have agreed to conduct parallel trade and investment cooperation talks after the US has finalised its negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) during the next two years to promote economic growth for both sides.

The agreement came on Tuesday following talks between Commerce Minister Apiradi Tantraporn and US Trade Representative Ambassador Michael Froman in Manila.

Apiradi said that the US has agreed to conduct parallel talks with Thailand in promoting trade and investment since Thailand has not yet joined the TPP.

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Posted by on Nov 20 2015. Filed under Regional News, Thailand Politics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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