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Thailand’s Ministry of Culture Bans Movie “Arbat” on Religious Grounds

The film follows the story of a young man who is forced into becoming a monk by his father. Alone and far from from home in the temple, the novice monk develops a non-platonic relationship with a local village girl

The film follows the story of a young man who is forced into becoming a monk by his father. Alone and far from from home in the temple, the novice monk develops a non-platonic relationship with a local village girl

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BANGKOK – Thailand’s ministry of culture announced Tuesday that the film, titled Arbat, would be denied its planned wide release on Thursday because it depicts “misconduct” by Thai monks, including drinking, drug-taking, violence and “improper relations” with women. The Thai censorship board said that some scenes were “disrespectful” to Buddha.

The film, directed by Kanittha Kwunyoo, tells the story of a young man who is forced by his father to become a monk. The young man later develops an intimate relationship with a village girl.

Producer and distributor, Sahamongkolfilm quickly cancelled a press screening scheduled for Tuesday and halted the commercial release planned for Thursday. It is allowed to appeal the ban.

Following the release of the film’s trailer last month, protest groups wrote to the ministry calling for a ban on the grounds that the film’s depictions may cause people to lose their Buddhist faith.

The ministry gave four reasons for its ban: depiction of monks engaged in violent conduct; monks drinking alcohol; monks in sexual relations; portraying images that are disrespectful to Buddha. Three of these contravene the five central precepts of Buddhism. The ministry said that the ban could be reversed if cuts were made to the movie.

Thai officialdom has previously intervened to defend the public image of the Buddhist religion as portrayed by the movie industry.

In 2006 Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s “Syndromes and a Century” was banned for showing monks kissing, drinking and playing guitar. Weerasethakul, who went on to win the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 2010 with “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives,” refused to make cuts and “Syndromes” remains unreleased in Thailand.

However, Thai news media regularly carries reports of monks who have made vast personal fortunes from their religious services, become celebrities and live decadent, materialistic lives.

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Posted by on Oct 13 2015. Filed under Regional News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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