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Thai Student Democracy Protesters ask for Open Military Court Proceedings

The students did not ask bail, saying that they have rejected the military court from the start arguing that they are civilians and, therefore, must be tried by a civilian court

The students did not ask bail, saying that they have rejected the military court from the start arguing that they are civilians and, therefore, must be tried by a civilian court

BANGKOK – The 14 students arrested by Thailand’s Army for protesting in Public for democracy will ask the Bangkok military court to hold the hearings of their case in open so that members of the public can have access to the trial.

Mr Krisdang Nutcharas, one of the student’s defense lawyers, said Friday that the plea for an open trial would be made by the 14 students on the day they are brought before the Bangkok military court for the extension of their detention.

The students, said the lawyer, claimed that there is nothing secret about their case and they have wanted members of the public to have access to the trial. If the court turns down their request, they may resort to some actions, he said without elaborating.

Mr Krisdang also explained why the students did not ask bail, saying that they have rejected the military court from the start arguing that they are civilians and, therefore, must be tried by a civilian court.

But if the case is transferred to a civilian court, they will ask for bail, said the lawyer.

As in the past six days since the detention of the students, a group of about 50 lecturers, students and human rights activists showed up at the Bangkok special prison on Friday to give moral support to the detainees.

The law lecturers of Thammasat Univeristy and lecturers from Mahidol University’s human rights and peace study institute issued a statement supporting the students’ call for democracy and their peaceful protests.  The statement was read out in front of the prison.

Meanwhile, The reconciliation committee chairman of the National Reform Council Anek Laothammathat has suggested a dialogue be held between government representatives and the 14 student activists in order to settle their differences.

He said that if both sides agreed to talk with each other, then the arrested students should refrain from holding any activities deemed opposing the military junta and the government, on the other hand, must stick to its political road-map.

He also urged the “five rivers” (the government, the NRC, the National Council for Peace and Order, the National Legislative Assembly and the Constitution Drafting Committee) to work together to bring about national reconciliation.

He warned that so long as political divide remains unresolved and even if there is peace in the country, political conflicts will emerge.

The reconciliation committee was due to meet Thursday to wrap up a report on ways and means to restore reconciliation for submission to the NRC president Mr Thienchay Kiranant.

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Posted by on Jul 3 2015. Filed under Thailand Politics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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