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Martial Law to Stay in Thailand Even though New Government Coming to Power

Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Thai Army Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha inspects the troops to celebrate the Thai Armed Foces Day at a military barrack on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand

Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Thai Army Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha inspects the troops to celebrate the Thai Armed Foces Day at a military barrack on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand

BANGKOK – Martial law now enforced across the country will still be in place though a new government under the leadership of Gen Prayuth Chan-ocha will come to power.

Spokesperson of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) Col Sirichan Ngathong reaffirmed the enforcement of the martial law, and said it  won’t be lifted despite that the country will have a new government.

She said the people still could lead their normal lives and tourists still are  visiting the country as usual and even on the rise.

She said the NCPO needs to retain martial law to ensure peace and order.

“As both prime minister and junta leader, General Prayuth can wield broad power without accountability,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “This marks a dark day for human rights and the future of democracy in Thailand.”

“As both prime minister and junta leader, General Prayuth can wield broad power without accountability,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “This marks a dark day for human rights and the future of democracy in Thailand.”

She assured that the presence of martial law would not hinder the new government in running the country.

Mean while City News in Chiang mai has reported, Critics have slammed the appointment of junta leader General Prayuth Chan-ocha as prime minister, calling it another setback for human rights in Thailand.

The military-dominated National Legislative Assembly unanimously approved General Prayuth as prime minister yesterday, while allowing him to remain head of the ruling National Council for Peace and Order.

“As both prime minister and junta leader, General Prayuth can wield broad power without accountability,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “This marks a dark day for human rights and the future of democracy in Thailand.”

HRW said the assembly appears to be merely a rubber stamp for the junta, instead of placing checks on its wide-ranging powers. It claims that during the presentation of the national budget proposal on Monday, not a single assembly member made a critical comment. After the presentation, Prayuth asked: “Anyone disagree with me?” The room remained silent, according to HRW.

The appointment of General Prayuth is “a disaster waiting to happen”, according to exiled academic Pavin Chachavalpongpun.

“From this moment on, as Prayuth becomes the supreme authority of Thai politics, he will move to further weaken democratic institutions,” Pavin told CityNews. “There will no doubt soon be some kind of political machinations put in place in order to ensure that politicians allied with Thaksin [Shinawatra] will not return to politics.”

Former prime minister Thaksin was deposed in a 2006 military coup, and the government of his sister Yingluck was overthrown in May this year.

Pavin, who lectures in the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at Kyoto University, has been stripped of his Thai passport and is currently applying for asylum in Japan.

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Posted by on Aug 22 2014. Filed under Thailand Politics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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