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Jen’s English Tip’s – Also / Too / Either

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The following is a mini-tutorial on the use of the words “also,” “too” and “either.”
Also
“Also” is used in positive sentences to add an agreeing thought.
Examples:
• Jane speaks French. Sam also speaks French.
• I love chocolate. I also love pizza.
• Frank can come with us. Nancy can also come with us.

PLACEMENT
“Also” comes after “to be.”
Examples:
• I am also Canadian.
• I was also there.

With verbs other than “to be,” “also” comes before single verb forms.

Examples:
• I also sing.
• He helped us also.

In verb tenses with many parts, “also” comes after the first part and before the second.
Examples:
• I have also been to Hong Kong.
• I am also studying economics.

Similarly, since modal verbs are usually followed by a second verb, “also” comes after modal verbs.

Examples:
• I can also speak French.
• I should also be there.

Too
“Too” is used in positive sentences to add an agreeing thought. It has the same meaning as “also,” but its placement within the sentence is different.
Examples:
• Jane speaks French. Sam speaks French too.
• I love chocolate. I love pizza too.
• Frank can come with us. Nancy can come with us too.

PLACEMENT
“Too” usually comes at the end of a clause.

Examples:
• I am Canadian too.
• I can speak French too.
• I am studying economics too.
• If he wants to go too, he should meet us at 8:00.

IMPORTANT
Although “too” is usually placed at the end of a clause, it can sometimes be used with commas after the subject of the sentence. This is usually only done in formal speech.

Examples:
• Mr. Jones wanted the contract. Ms. Jackson, too, thought it was necessary.
• Donna is working on a solution to the problem. I, too, am trying to find a way to resolve the conflict.

Either
“Either” is used in negative sentences to add an agreeing thought.

Examples:
• Jane doesn’t speak French. Sam doesn’t speak French either.
• I don’t love chocolate. I don’t love pizza either.
• Frank cannot come with us. Nancy cannot come with us either.
PLACEMENT
“Either” usually comes at the end of a clause.

Examples:
• I cannot speak French either.
• I am not studying economics either.
• I don’t want to eat either.
• I didn’t like the movie either.

Confusing Sentences
Sometimes the first sentence is negative and the agreeing idea is positive.

Examples:
• The weather wasn’t very appealing. I also wanted to stay home and finish my book. That’s why I didn’t go to the beach.
• The car wasn’t expensive, and I needed a way to get around town too. That’s why I bought it.
Sometimes the first sentence is positive and the agreeing idea is negative.

Examples:
• Jane is too short. She is not a good athlete either. I don’t think she would make a good basketball player.
• He is lazy. He doesn’t study either. That’s why he doesn’t do well in school.

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Posted by on Jul 30 2015. Filed under English Tips by Jen. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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