|

Japanese Study finds link between Diabetes and Daytime Napping

 doctors found that those who felt very sleepy during the day had a 56% higher risk of being diabetic than those who didn’t

doctors found that those who felt very sleepy during the day had a 56% higher risk of being diabetic than those who didn’t

,

.

TOKYO – Researchers at the University of Tokyo have reported that daytime drowsiness and taking long naps during the day was associated with an increased prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, according to a review of past studies.

Researchers at the University of Tokyo reviewed 10 studies including a total of more than 260,000 individuals, looking for links between daytime sleepiness or napping and the risk of Type 2 diabetes.

The doctors found that those who felt very sleepy during the day had a 56% higher risk of being diabetic than those who didn’t, while those who took naps of 60 minutes or more had a 46% higher risk of having the condition than those who took no or smaller naps.

The study, to be presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes conference in Stockholm on Friday, shows an association between the two conditions but doesn’t prove cause and effect. Still, researchers say their findings suggest excessive sleepiness and long napping during the day may be a warning signal of Type 2 diabetes.

People who experience these conditions should see a doctor to have their symptoms evaluated, said Dr. Tomohide Yamada, a researcher at the department of diabetes and metabolic diseases at the University of Tokyo in Japan.

Dr. Yamada noted the possibility of reverse causality, meaning people who are already suffering from bad health may be more inclined to feel sleepy or take longer daytime naps.

 The analysis showed there was no adverse link between short naps of about 40 minutes a day and Type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have found beneficial health effects of taking naps of 30 minutes or less a day including increased alertness and improved motor skills.

One in 13 adult Thais has diabetes

Diabetes is a growing public health challenge for Thailand. One in 13 adult Thais has diabetes, a lifelong illness that increases the risk to suffer heart attacks and strokes at an early age and can lead to premature death. Over time, diabetes can damage the heart blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.

Diabetes occurs either when the body does not produce enough insulin (the hormone that regulates blood sugar) or cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. The body’s response to excess glucose in the blood is to get rid of it through frequent urination. In the Thai langauge, diabetes is referred to as the “sweet urine disease”. In rural areas, villagers often first become aware that it is present because they notice ants gathering around their outdoor toilet.

To prevent and control the disease, the Government of Thailand developed a strategy to promote a balanced diet and physical activity. The strategy also looks at ways to provide social and emotional support to people with diabetes. All government health security schemes cover the costly care for the chronic disease.

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Short URL: http://www.chiangraitimes.com/?p=34490

Posted by on Sep 18 2015. Filed under Health. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
Photo of White Beach in Boracay, Philippines

In Loving Memory of His Majesty the King

Photo of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej
Learning Thai with Jen