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It’s Official, Aung San Suu Kyi’s Opposition Party has Won Majority in Myanmar Elections

more than 80% of contested seats now declared, Aung San Suu Kyi’s party has more than the two-thirds it needs to choose the president, ending decades of military-backed rule.

With more than 80% of contested seats now declared, Aung San Suu Kyi’s party has more than the two-thirds it needs to choose the president, ending decades of military-backed rule.

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YANGON – Myanmar’s election commission said on Friday that Myanmar’s opposition National League for Democracy has won a landslide election victory, giving it enough seats to elect its chosen candidate to the presidency when the new legislature convenes next year.

With more than 80% of contested seats now declared, Aung San Suu Kyi’s party has more than the two-thirds it needs to choose the president, ending decades of military-backed rule.

A quarter of seats are automatically held by the military, meaning it remains hugely influential.

Under the constitution, Ms Suu Kyi cannot become president herself, the BBC reports.

Despite this, the election was seen as the first openly contested poll in Myanmar – also known as Burma – in 25 years.


Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi waves at supporters as she visits polling stations at her constituency Kawhmu township November 8, 2015. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi waves at supporters as she visits polling stations at her constituency Kawhmu township November 8, 2015


Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) had been expected take control of parliament since Sunday’s nationwide vote, and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and US President Barack Obama had already congratulated her on a landmark victory in the country’s first free election in 25 years.

Obama and Ban also praised Myanmar President Thein Sein for successfully staging the historic poll, with the UN chief acknowledging his “courage and vision” to organise an election in which the ruling camp was trounced.

Results have been trickling in since the weekend, and on Friday the election commission announced the latest batch of seats that pushed the NLD over the threshold to secure an absolute majority in parliament.

The triumph of the charismatic Nobel peace prize laureate sweeps out an old guard of former generals that has run Myanmar, also known as Burma, since Thein Sein ushered in a raft of democratic and economic reforms four years ago.

Thein Sein, whose semi-civilian government took power when the ruling junta stepped aside in 2011, and powerful army chief Min Aung Hlaing said they would respect the result and hold reconciliation talks with Suu Kyi soon.

Such unambiguous endorsements of Suu Kyi’s victory could smooth the lengthy post-election transition ahead of the last session of the old parliament, which reconvenes on Monday.

With Suu Kyi’s victory confirmed, the focus will quickly shift to NLD’s presidential candidate and its plans for government.

Myanmar’s president runs the executive, with the exception of the powerful ministries of interior, defense and border security, which are controlled by the military.

Under the indirect electoral system, the upper house, lower house, and military bloc in parliament each put forward a presidential candidate. The combined houses then vote on the three candidates, who do not have to be elected members of parliament.

The winner becomes president and forms a government, while the losers become vice presidents with largely ceremonial responsibilities.

With the latest results from the election commission, Suu Kyi’s majority in the lower house is big enough to give the NLD an overall majority in the joint chambers.

he vote for the presidency will take place after the new members take their seats in both houses in February. The president will assume power by the end of March.

Suu Kyi is barred from becoming president by the junta-drafted constitution because her children are foreign nationals.

She has become increasingly defiant on the presidential clause as the scale of her victory has become apparent, making it clear she will run the country regardless of who the NLD elects as president.

“He will have no authority. He will act in accordance with the decisions of the party,” said Suu Kyi in an interview with Channel News Asia, adding that the president would be “told exactly what he can do.”

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Posted by on Nov 13 2015. Filed under World News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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