|

Buddhist Monk And Young Boy Amoung Six Killed in Pattani Revenge Attack

Villagers help carry the body of a 68-year old Buddhist monk who was slain by suspect gunmen at Mae Lan district of Pattani province, southern Thailand

Villagers help carry the body of a 68-year old Buddhist monk who was slain by suspect gunmen at Mae Lan district of Pattani province, southern Thailand

 

PATTANI – Four people, including a Buddhist monk and a young boy, were killed and six others were injured in an attack in Thailand’s violence-plagued south on Thursday, Thai police said.

A monk and three civilians were shot dead and a policeman and five other civilians wounded in a drive-by shooting in Pattani Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/security/394848/murders-in-pattani-draw-condemnation. View our policies at http://goo.gl/9HgTd and http://goo.gl/ou6Ip. © Post Publishing PCL. All rights reserved.

A monk and three civilians were shot dead and a policeman and five other civilians wounded in a drive-by shooting in Pattani

 

He said a 68-year-old monk, one woman and her 13-year-old son, and another woman were killed in the Thursday morning attack.

Sathit said six others, including a police officer in a squad protecting the monk, were wounded.

Police said they were looking for the gunmen who fled on two motorcycles.

It is the second time in three weeks a Buddhist monk has been shot dead by suspected insurgents.

Police Col. Sathit Polpinit said that four gunmen opened fire at a group of villagers giving alms to a Buddhist monk in Mae Lan district in Pattani province.

Polpinit said the attacks were in revenge for the deaths of three Muslim brothers aged three, five and nine, who were gunned down in front of their home in neighbouring Narathiwat province.

The boy’s deaths had set off “a chain reaction”, said Srisompob Jitpiromsri of the Deep South Watch think-tank.

Thailand is a mainly Buddhist country, but the three southern provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat are majority-Muslim and resistance to central government rule has existed there for decades, resurfacing violently in 2004.

“Emotions in the local community are running high, on both sides, and the insurgent movement has taken their deaths as an opportunity for revenge,” he said.

“It will be difficult for the authorities to control the violence unless they can bring the boys’ killers to justice.”

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Short URL: http://www.chiangraitimes.com/?p=22214

Posted by on Feb 13 2014. Filed under Regional News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.
Photo of White Beach in Boracay, Philippines
Learning Thai with Jen
Learning Thai with Jen